The A to Z of Early North America (The A to Z Guide Series) by Cameron B. Wesson

By Cameron B. Wesson

These strange with the prehistory of North the USA have a normal belief of the cultures of the continent that incorporates local americans residing in tipis, donning feathered headdresses and buckskin garments, and following migratory bison herds at the nice Plains. even supposing those practices have been a part of a few local American societies, they don't effectively symbolize the variety of cultural practices by means of the overpowering majority of local American peoples. Media misrepresentations formed via tv and films in addition to a spotlight on choose areas and classes within the historical past of the us have produced a very distorted view of the indigenous population of the continent and their cultures. The indigenous populations of North the USA created awesome societies, engaged in exchange, and had different monetary, social, and non secular cultures. during the last century, archaeological and ethnological examine all through all areas of North the USA has published a lot in regards to the indigenous peoples of the continent. This ebook examines the lengthy and complicated heritage of human profession in North the USA, overlaying its unique tradition in addition to components of the Arctic, California, jap Woodlands, nice Basin, nice Plains, Northwest Coast, Plateau, Southwest, and Subarctic. whole with maps, a chronology that spans the background from 11,000 B.C. to A.D. 1850, an introductory essay, greater than seven-hundred dictionary entries, and a accomplished bibliography, this reference is a beneficial instrument for students and scholars. An appendix of museums that experience North American collections and a list of archaeological websites that permit excursions by means of the general public additionally make this an available advisor to the lay reader and highschool scholar.

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These scholars influenced the development of culture historical perspectives among American archaeologists, while a later generation (heavily influenced by Walter Taylor), including Lewis Binford, Michael Schiffer, and Patty Jo Watson, would steer the field toward theoretical and methodological concerns of a more scientific and comparative nature, known as processual archaeology. See also ABERDEEN SITE; AGATE BASIN SITE; ANANGULA SITE; AVONLEA SITE; AZTALAN SITE; BAKER CAVE SITE; BAT CAVE SITE; BAUMER SITE; BLACK EARTH SITE; BLACK MESA SITE; BLACKWATER DRAW SITE; BONFIRE SHELTER SITE; BORAX LAKE SITE; BRAND SITE; BROKEN MAMMOTH SITE; CAHOKIA SITE; CASPER SITE; CHACO CANYON; CHALUKA SITE; CHETRO KETL; CLOVIS SITE; COLBY MAMMOTH SITE; COWBOY CAVE SITE; CROOKS SITE; DANGER CAVE SITE; DRAPER SITE; ETOWAH SITE; FOLSOM SITE; HARDAWAY SITE; ICEHOUSE BOTTOM SITE; JAKETOWN SITE; JESSE JENNINGS; JONES-MILLER SITE; KIMMSWICK SITE; KING SITE; MADELINE KNEBERG; KOLOMOKI SITE; KOSTER SITE; LACE SITE; LEHNER SITE; LINDENMEIER SITE; LITTLE EGYPT SITE; LITTLE SALT SPRINGS SITE; MCKEITHEN SITE; MEADOWCROFT ROCKSHELTER; MEAD SITE; MESA SITE; MESA VERDE; WARREN K.

21x10-6 ounces]). P. in age. AMS dating has been particularly useful for North American archaeology in research directed at the role of Paleoindians in the extinction of North American megafauna. ACCULTURATION. Process through which a cultural group adopts the material, social, and behavioral patterns of another society with which it has contact. Anthropologists have defined cases in which acculturation is symmetrical, with each society becoming increasingly like the other. However, in most cases the process of acculturation is decidedly asymmetrical, with one group’s culture becoming increasingly like that of the culture with which it has contact.

Many Native American cultures, including the Choctaw of the Southeast, practiced artificial cranial deformation as a way of altering an individual’s appearance to meet culturally specific ideas of attractiveness and as an indicator of social status. The artificial shaping of a child’s head was often accomplished through the use of a cradleboard or by tying constrictive bands of fabric around the head. ASCRIBED STATUS. Social standing that is not directly representative of an individual’s efforts or achievements, but is instead the result of inheritance or other hereditary factors.

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