The Cambridge ancient history. The High Empire 70-192 by Peter Garnsey, Dominic Rathbone, Alan K. Bowman

By Peter Garnsey, Dominic Rathbone, Alan K. Bowman

V. 1, pt. 1. Prolegomena and prehistory / edited via I.E.S. Edwards, C.J. Gadd, and N.G.L. Hammond -- v. 1, pt. 2. Early background of the center East / edited via I.E.S. Edwards, C.J. Gadd and N.G L. Hammond -- v. 2, pt. 1. background of the center East and the Aegean zone c. 1800-1380 B.C. / edited by means of I.E.S. Edwards ... [et al.] -- v. 2, pt. 2. heritage of the center East and the Aegean area, c. 1380-1000 B.C. / edited via I.E.S. Edwards ... [et al.]. -- v. three, pt. 1. The prehistory of the Balkans; and the center East and the Aegean global, 10th to 8th centuries B.C. / edited via John Boardman ... [et al.]. second ed. -- v. three, pt. 2. The Assyrian and Babylonian empires and different states of the close to East, from the 8th to the 6th centuries, B.C. 2d ed. -- v. three, pt. three. the growth of the Greek global, 8th to 6th centuries B.C. / edited by means of John Boardman, N.G.L. Hammond. second ed. -- v. four. Persia, Greece, and the western Mediterranean, c. 525 to 479 B.C. / edited by way of John Boardman ... [et al.]. 2d ed. -- v. five. The 5th century B.C. / edited via D.M. Lewis ... [et al.]. 2d ed.-- v. 6. The fourth century B.C. / edited through D.M. Lewis ... [et al.]. 2d ed. -- v. 7, pt. 1. The Hellenistic global / edited by way of F.W. Walbank ... [et al.]. second ed. -- v. 7, pt. 2. the increase of Rome to 220 B.C. / edited through F.W. Walbank ... [et al.]. second ed. -- v. eight. Rome and the Mediterranean to 133 B.C. / edited via A.E. Astin ... [et al.]. 2d ed. -- v. nine. The final age of the Roman Republic, 146-43 B.C. 2d ed. -- v. 10. The Augustan Empire, forty three B.C.-A.D. sixty nine -- v. eleven. The excessive Empire, A.D. 70-192 / edited through Alan okay. Bowman, Peter Garnsey, Dominic Rathbone -- v. 12. The difficulty of empire, A.D. 193-337 / edited via Alan ok. Bowman, Peter Garnsey, Averil Cameron -- v. thirteen. The overdue Empire, A.D. 337-425 -- v. 14. past due antiquity: Empire and successors, A.D. 425-600 / edited by means of Averil Cameron, Bryan Ward-Perkins, Michael Whitby

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The Cambridge ancient history. The High Empire 70-192

V. 1, pt. 1. Prolegomena and prehistory / edited via I. E. S. Edwards, C. J. Gadd, and N. G. L. Hammond -- v. 1, pt. 2. Early heritage of the center East / edited by means of I. E. S. Edwards, C. J. Gadd and N. G L. Hammond -- v. 2, pt. 1. heritage of the center East and the Aegean zone c. 1800-1380 B. C. / edited by way of I.

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Iul. ; Claud. . 66 NSC () =MW ; ILS =Smallwood, GCN no. ; Tac. Ann. –; Sen. Brev. Vit. ; see Boatwright (). 63 64 Cambridge Histories Online © Cambridge University Press, 2008   the first half of , thus soon after the conclusion of his joint censorship with Titus in –, in which not only the population was recorded but the whole city carefully measured. Pliny’s account of these measurements perhaps reflects, not only his own, but Vespasian’s interest in antiquarian detail, similar to that displayed by Claudius in his speech to the Senate justifying his extension.

Tac. Hist. ; Charlesworth in CAH 1 –; Suet. . Walker ()  ff. puts the drop at  per cent. Butcher and Ponting () – suggest that  96 per cent would be a more accurate estimate. Tac. Hist. ; Suet. Vesp.  97 Tac. Hist. ; cf. ; Suet. Vesp. . 94 95 Cambridge Histories Online © Cambridge University Press, 2008   and XVI Gallica, had mutinied, while XV Primigenia had surrendered to the Gallic rebels at Castra Vetera. Of the remaining three German legions, XXI Rapax and XXII Primigenia were only moved from Upper to Lower Germany and the V Alaudae was probably sent to Moesia.

Hist. . 38 Tacitus mentions senatorial grants of traditional powers to Otho (Hist. ) and to Vitellius (Hist. ). Cambridge Histories Online © Cambridge University Press, 2008  .   decree conferring ‘all the customary powers voted to principes’ in the last days of December : the linguistic form is that of the rogatio put to the assembly for ratification. The decree and law granted Vespasian (in the first part, now lost) imperium and tribunician power, the main constitutional powers of the princeps, and (in the preserved part) a number of accumulated imperial prerogatives.

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