The Cambridge Ancient History Volume 3, Part 1 The by John Boardman, I. E. S. Edwards, N. G. L. Hammond, E.

By John Boardman, I. E. S. Edwards, N. G. L. Hammond, E. Sollberger

Quantity III of The Cambridge old historical past used to be first released in 1925 in a single quantity. the recent variation has extended to such an quantity, as a result of the titanic quantity of latest details now to be had, that it has needed to be divided into 3 components. quantity III half 1 opens with a survey of the Balkans north of Greece within the Prehistoric interval. this can be the 1st time this sort of survey has been released of this sector which in addition to its intrinsic curiosity is critical for its effect at the cultures of the Aegean and Anatolia. the remainder of the ebook is dedicated to the 10th to the 8th centuries B. C. In Greece and the Aegean the most subject is the sluggish regeneration from the darkish Age and the emergence of a society within which could be visible the beginnings of the city-state. in the course of the related interval in Western Asia and the center East the Kingdoms of Assyria and Babylonia upward push to strength, the Urartians look, and in Palestine the kingdoms of Israel and Judah flourish. In Egypt the country's fortunes revive in brief less than Shoshenq I. the ultimate bankruptcy during this half offers with the languages of Greece and the Balkans and with the discovery and unfold of alphabetic writing.

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The Cambridge Ancient History Volume 3, Part 1 The Prehistory of the Balkans, the Middle East and the Aegean World, Tenth to Eighth Centuries BC

Quantity III of The Cambridge historical historical past was once first released in 1925 in a single quantity. the hot version has elevated to such an volume, because of the gigantic volume of recent info now to be had, that it has needed to be divided into 3 elements. quantity III half 1 opens with a survey of the Balkans north of Greece within the Prehistoric interval.

Additional info for The Cambridge Ancient History Volume 3, Part 1 The Prehistory of the Balkans, the Middle East and the Aegean World, Tenth to Eighth Centuries BC

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The horse was probably used for riding. V. THE NEOLITHIC—ENEOLITHIC PERIOD A thorough knowledge of this period in Romania has been gained in the past five decades, during which research has spotlighted many previously unknown cultural features. Essential questions of the period - the conditions of transition from food-gathering to specifically Neolithic food-production, the time when the 'Neolithic revolution' began on the Danube and in the Carpathians, the origin, development, division into periods and chronology of the various cultures, etc.

Cucuteni covered the whole area of the Precucuteni culture, extending as far as the Dnieper (Tripolye). All settlements were situated close to a watercourse or spring. A trend towards choosing less readily accessible places — higher terraces or islands — became manifest in the course of time, and caves were inhabited fairly often. From Advanced Neolithic times some settlements were fortified with a V-shaped or flat-bottomed ditch, and in Eneolithic times many had one or two such ditches and sometimes an earth or stone wall or a palisade.

One Cambridge Histories Online © Cambridge University Press, 2008 THE NEOLITHIC-ENEOLITHIC PERIOD 25 cannot claim that the populations which brought the Neolithic revolution to the Danube, and some of those which followed them, belonged to some Indo-European group,76 unless one admits that the eastern Mediterranean was inhabited by Indo-Europeans in the Neolithic period. It is much more likely that the Neolithic populations south of the Danube were pre-Indo-European and assimilated the possibly Proto-European Epipalaeolithic-Mesolithic populations north of the Danube.

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