Under Sentence of Death: Lynching in the South by W. Fitzhugh Brundage

By W. Fitzhugh Brundage

From the assembled paintings of fifteen prime students emerges a fancy and provocative portrait of lynching within the American South. With topics ranging in time from the overdue antebellum interval to the early 20th century, and in position from the border states to the Deep South, this selection of essays offers a wealthy comparative context within which to check the troubling background of lynching. overlaying a vast spectrum of methodologies, those essays additional extend the examine of lynching by way of exploring such themes as same-race lynchings, black resistance to white violence, and the political motivations for lynching. In addressing either the background and the legacy of lynching, the booklet increases very important questions on Southern background, race relatives, and the character of yank violence. even though interested by occasions within the South, those essays converse to styles of violence, injustice, and racism that experience plagued the complete nation.The individuals are Bruce E. Baker, E. M. Beck, W. Fitzhugh Brundage, Joan E. Cashin, Paula Clark, Thomas G. Dyer, Terence Finnegan, Larry J. Griffin, Nancy MacLean, William S. McFeely, Joanne C. Sandberg, Patricia A. Schechter, Roberta Senechal de l. a. Roche, Stewart E. Tolnay, and George C. Wright.

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Under Sentence of Death: Lynching in the South

From the assembled paintings of fifteen top students emerges a fancy and provocative portrait of lynching within the American South. With topics ranging in time from the overdue antebellum interval to the early 20th century, and in position from the border states to the Deep South, this number of essays offers a wealthy comparative context within which to check the troubling heritage of lynching.

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Why, for the same alleged offense, did southerners lynch in one situation and not in another? Why might lynchers kill one alleged offender in one case and multiple victims in another? What accounts for the variation in the severĀ­ ity seen from one lynching to another? , racism or the southern code of honor). Instead, she draws upon the paradigm and concepts of sociolo22 : Part ! gist Donald Black and treats lynching as a means of social control-one of many ways humans handle the misconduct of others.

Griffin, Paula Clark, and Joanne C. Sandberg resistance played out by Funderberg and Harris in their initial interaction about liquor, and of the solidaristic vengeance killing) are defined in a way that is often masked by narrative sequence. Second, the analysis reveals those actions which, in a precise sense, are most significant to the entire event. These include, of course, the actions of the white townspeople and policemen. Another event-defining action is the report to others of Funderberg's death by his friends.

Many southern blacks both fiercely and subtly resisted the oppression and degradations of segregation and mob rule. But others adopted a survival mechanism-aiding white vigilantes-that extended beyond acquiescence to Jim Crow. Blacks ev({n infrequently joined white mobs in the search for fleeing Mrican Americans. 22 Whether or not the particular African American who told whites where Harris was hiding knew that the deputy and sheriff had washed their hands of the affair, all blacks lmew the racist nature of Jim Crow's legal system.

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